Best Films to Watch in London and Stream This Week

From a Soderbergh heist flick to some insightful documentaries, here's what to watch this weekend at home and in the capital...

UK cinemas are back and here at WLC we couldn't be more pleased about the return to our happy place – a darkened theatre, surrounded by our fellow movie lovers! But we also know that maybe everyone's not ready yet. That's why our team has you covered with all the latest releases, be it in cinemas, or streaming from the comfort of your own home…

 

New in Cinemas and Streaming

My Little Sister

Where to watch it: Get London showtimes

The great Nina Hoss gives a remarkable performance in this affecting tale of a brother and sister facing a tragic diagnosis (read our full review).

 

No Sudden Move

Where to watch it: Now (from 9 October)

Steven Soderbergh delivers another entertaining heist flick, this time set in the 1950s and starring Don Cheadle and Benicio del Toro.

 

Oliver Sacks: His Own Life

Where to watch it: Various digital platforms

The legendary neurologist and thinker gets a beautifully honest and intimate documentary profile, filmed in the months preceding his death.

 

Fever Dream

Where to watch it: Get London showtimes

This strange and disorientating adaptation of the acclaimed book chronicles a woman’s search for the truth from a hospital bed.

 

Romantic Road

Where to watch it: Get London showtimes

An elderly English couple decide to take a 6-month-trip across India to Bangladesh in a vintage Rolls-Royce. What could go wrong?

 

The Beatles and India

Where to watch it: Various digital platforms

This affable and informative documentary hones in on the Fab Four as their arrival in India brings global attention to the country in 1968.

Still in Cinemas and Streaming

No Time to Die

Where to watch it: Get London showtimes

The fifth and final chapter in the Daniel Craig line of James Bond movies finally arrives in cinemas after an 18-month delay (read our full review).

 

Anne at 13,000 Ft.

Where to watch it: MUBI

Writer-director Kazik Radwanski’s lo-fi drama centres on a troubled woman who finds an emotional release through the act of skydiving (read our full review).

 

The Guilty

Where to watch it: Netflix

Jake Gyllenhaal stars in this slick remake of the acclaimed Danish thriller about a 911 operator’s exploits over the course of a single day (read our full review).

 

Freshman Year

Where to watch it: Prime Video (rent or buy)

Cooper Raiff writes, directs and stars in this very funny and unashamedly awkward mumblecore comedy about going off to college (read our full review).

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Reviews

Sediments review – refreshing and unidealised portrait of trans women

This breezy documentary follows a group of Spanish trans women on a road trip as they bond and bicker their way to León

The Worst Person in the World review – truly incandescent Nordic rom-com

Renate Reinsve is irresistible in Joachim Trier's exceptional and refreshing take on a well-worn genre, with shades of Frances Ha

Dune review – sci-fi epic could be this decade’s defining blockbuster

Denis Villeneuve's adaptation of the classic novel crafts the most complete fantastical world since Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings

The French Dispatch review – Wes Anderson’s reverent ode to print journalism

The writer-director's ambitious 10th feature, his most idiosyncratic work yet, is a charming buffet of unabashed Francophilia